Several of my coaching clients have been so scared or troubled with some of the recent cannibal reports out of Florida and New Jersey that they can’t focus at work.The media caused a major frenzy and from the looks of it has seriously affected sales of HEALTHY BATH SALTS like Epsom Salts by as much as 80%.

What I didn’t know was how many people actually confused Epsom salts with “Bath Salts”…I was SHOCKED how many people thought it was one in the same, I even got eyeballed at the local Walmart when I purchased two packages or Dr. Teal’s Epsom Salts and I decided to write something to clear the air. 

Epsom Bath Salts help replenish magnesium in the body, which can make energy levels increase. Which, in turn, can make you look and feel better. Absorbing magnesium via Epsom Salt baths can also relieves stress, increasing serotonin levels (to help avoid depression) and lowering blood pressure.

My local CVS Pharmacy manager told me,”Epsom Salt sales dropped 80% in the month of May due to “Bath Salts” media frenzy and a Local town Doctor commented, “the sickness might be from magnesium toxicity in Epsom Salts.” My poor 86-year-old year old grandmother told me, “I’m not soaking my toes in those bath salts, they make you crazy.”

I couldn’t believe it, but as I scanned the media coverage of the recent supposed “BATH SALTS” related cannibalism attack in South Florida didn’t even specify that EPSOM SALTS had nothing to do with “Bath Salts”, scaring thousands of people worldwide who rely on the benefits of Epsom Salts thinking they could turn into “Crazy Flesh Eating Zombies”, if they soaked their sore feet.Image

Please watch the video below — WARNING, THIS VIDEO IS GRAPHIC AND DISTURBING:

“BATH SALTS” is some bad street name for some obviously terrible new street drug that needs to be outlawed, but the media needs to really be more responsible in explaining these trending stories better to avoid mass confusion and potential hysteria, especially in Florida, which safely retires many of our oldest Americans.  

According to Dr.. Richard J. Geller of the California Poison Control System, the problem is what’s inside these so-called salts. The most common ingredient used in bath salts is called 3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone, also known as MDPV (marketed as Ivory Wave and Energy-1). But also commonly found inside that “instant spa at home” is Mephedrone, aka 4-Methylmethcathinone, a compound very similar in structure to Methamphetamine. It’s marketed with names like Bounce, Bubbles, M-CAT, Mad Cow, and Meow Meow.

Other substances Geller says are “implicated” as “bath salts” include 3,4-Methylenedioxymethcathinone (Methylone), 4-Methoxymethcathinone, 4-Fluoromethcathinone, and3-Fluoromethcathinone. All four are derivatives of Methcathinone, also known as Khat, Jeff, and Cat, a drug Geller says is structurally and pharmaceutically similar to methamphetamine. The Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) has it listed as a “schedule one” drug under the Controlled Substances Act — the same class as heroin, pot, and mescalin.

Finally, some GOOD news!!! Experts say a traditional bath salt that contains sodium chloride (sea salt) or magnesium sulfate (epsom salt) is not what the kids are looking for; so if that’s in your bathroom, your kids are safe.

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